Choosing The Right Wheels

Once you’ve decided it’s time for a wheel upgrade, how do you know how to select the best bicycle wheel sets? It’s actually pretty straightforward. You already know what bike they’re for, so simply check the label on the tire to find the size. Write that down. That’s the tire size but also the wheel size and it’s the starting point for getting the right wheels. If you’re not sure you can also just ride by the shop and we’ll take a look and tell you.

 

Next think about what you want these new wheels to do for you. Maybe you’re replacing old, bent wheels and looking for a set that’ll hold up better to the way you ride. You could be looking for an easier ride from some lighter, better-designed wheels. Or, it could be a second set of “event” wheels to give you an advantage on certain types of courses, or race wheels to replace your heavier, slower training wheels on the big day. If you can tell us what you’re looking for in wheels we can point you toward a perfect pair.

 

Options and Tips On Deciding

Following are some of the common features found on today’s road, tri and mountain wheels, and some guidelines to help you determine what’s best for you, your bicycle and your riding.

 

  • Wheel Types

Obviously, there are wheels for the dirt and different wheels for the road so that’s one starting point. If you’re looking at off-road wheels you decide, based on your bike, whether they’re disc-brake specific or ready for rim brakes. The difference is that wheels for discs have hubs that accept the rotors (what the disc brakes grab), and usually have rims without a true braking surface, which saves weight at the rim.

 

Rim-brake wheels don’t have any provision for attaching rotors and feature rim sides made to withstand the wear and tear of rim brakes. Note that if you need wheels to use on two bikes, one with discs, one with rim brakes, you can find those too. They’ll have a rim made for braking and a hub setup to accept rotors.

 

When it comes to wheels for the road, there are all-around models made to deliver excellent ride quality and durability that work great for upgrading an old pair. There are also models designed to give you some free speed according to how you use them. For example there are climbing wheels that are built lighter for easier ascending, aero wheels practically invisible to the wind and all-around road wheels that combine lightness, aerodynamics and a compliant ride.

 

  • Tube or Tubeless

Another choice is whether to get dedicated “tubeless” wheels or standard models. Tubeless means that the rim is made to provide an airtight seal for use with tubeless tires. This is important since you run tubeless tires without inner tubes, which allows running lower pressures for a smoother ride and more traction and control.

 

It’s possible with a conversion kit to install tubeless tires on standard wheels, however, getting the dedicated wheels made for tubeless means easier tire installation and no need for the special conversion rim strips. So, if you enjoy riding tubeless on the pavement or dirt, you should consider upgrading to tubeless wheels. Note that these wheels all accept standard tires with tubes too.

 

  • Tubular Wheels

If you race the road you might want to consider “tubular” wheels, which are the lightest available and most unusual. They require special tires called “tubulars” or “sew-ups” (because the tire is actually sewn together around the tube). These tires have truly round profiles and they are installed by gluing them to the rim. Proponents of this design love the quickness and suppleness of these featherweight, round-profile tires and don’t mind the more difficult mounting procedure.

 

  • Rim Shape

The shape of the rim has a lot to do with how the wheel rides. The stiffer the rim the more you feel the road and trail. And, the more triangulated and deep (tall) a rim is, the more rigid the ride. Most of the time, on smooth surfaces you’ll notice stiffness less than on rougher ones. And, stiffness is a good thing for racing and hammering because more of your power makes it to the road.

 

If you’re looking for slippery wheels for an advantage racing triathlons or time trials, or even for getting maximum rest sitting in the pack at your road races and then sprinting faster for the line, look at wheels with deep-section rims, which can be as tall as 90mm or more. For lighter weight and better handling in crosswinds, check out wheels with smaller profiles like 28mm.

 

Besides how deep the rim is, the width makes a difference too. Wider rims (about 23mm) tend to offer a nicer ride and more durability since they spread the tire sides allowing more air and flotation. Meanwhile, narrower (usually 19mm) means more aero advantages and lighter weight.

 

  • Hubs

Wheels spin on the hubs, which are the component at the center of the wheel where the spokes originate. They have bearings and axles inside, and on the drivetrain side either threads for cogs or a “freehub,” that the cluster of gears (called the “cassette”) mounts on. Cassettes are sold separately.

 

Come Check Out Some Wheels In Person

Hope these basic tips take some of the mystery out of wheel shopping. If you need more information of bicycle wheel sets, I can recommend you to visit Bevato International Corp. – they are the professional bicycle parts manufacturer in Taiwan. You can find kinds of high-quality bicycle frames, front forks, bar ends, and much more accessories at BEV. Now, welcome to check out their website and feel free to contact with BEV for more details!

 

Article Source: https://www.wheelworld.com/articles/buyers-guide-to-bicycle-wheelsets-pg271.htm

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